'Create a new world not based on money'

Stroud News and Journal: This week's Christian comment is brought to you by Graham Collins of the Holy Trinity Church, Stroud This week's Christian comment is brought to you by Graham Collins of the Holy Trinity Church, Stroud

Christian comment with Graham Collins of the Holy Trinity Church, Stroud

ONE of the things about the Christmas period is that you hear plenty of music, whatever its era.

One of my favourite pieces is the New World Symphony with its uplifting score and dramatic ending.

It made me think about this New Year and all it holds for each of us.

This is totally unknown of course, despite our plans, for life can change those in an instant.

We seem to live in a World where self-centredness is common, things are often appreciated more than people and compassion and consideration for others is not as common as it once was.

But what if that changed?

What if we had a New World where love, joy and peace were the fundamental values, rather than money.

Where we all actively found ways to support each other and create a just and considerate society?

Not as daft as it sounds.

We get closest to this approach at Christmas, where we often help others with gifts of time and money, given to worthy causes.

The outpouring of grief for Nelson Mandela during the past month has reflected his wonderful approach to life based on compassion and care for all and desire for peace and reconciliation amongst his people in South Africa.

Perhaps again we can learn from him and his legacy of consideration for others.

Jesus Christ himself faced the challenges of a materialistic society and one where justice was based on the sword.

Punishments were extreme and of course he suffered the Romans ultimate punishment in the shape of crucifixion.

Yet, he forgave his persecutors just as Nelson Mandela did some 2,000 years later.

Can we not learn from them what is important?

We have much to learn about life and living together and the Bible teaches us, particularly in the Book of Revelation, that we can enjoy a New World in Christ that will truly show us a place of love, joy and peace.

Surely that is a New World worth having.

A Very Happy New Year to you all.

Comments (21)

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9:49am Sun 29 Dec 13

Cuthbert Thickett says...

Brilliant comment, maybe Neil Carmichael should read it. Sadly we all need money, and our society today seems to value those who have the most of it. Money does not equal happiness and it does not make you a better person. Jesus Christ understood this, but today that has been lost in the all encompassing pursuit of more wealth, and our materialistic way of life. It matters not that some believe Jesus was the son of god or not, the principles of love, care and goodwill to all men do not require money, it requires that we all strive to become better people and to do all that we can to help those less fortunate.
Brilliant comment, maybe Neil Carmichael should read it. Sadly we all need money, and our society today seems to value those who have the most of it. Money does not equal happiness and it does not make you a better person. Jesus Christ understood this, but today that has been lost in the all encompassing pursuit of more wealth, and our materialistic way of life. It matters not that some believe Jesus was the son of god or not, the principles of love, care and goodwill to all men do not require money, it requires that we all strive to become better people and to do all that we can to help those less fortunate. Cuthbert Thickett

11:18am Sun 29 Dec 13

dimreepr says...

The swapping of little green pieces of paper instead of piglets or eggs has little to do with happiness; the far more likely explanation is the disconnection of need and want.
The swapping of little green pieces of paper instead of piglets or eggs has little to do with happiness; the far more likely explanation is the disconnection of need and want. dimreepr

1:06pm Mon 30 Dec 13

Nimue Brown says...

Well said. These are good principles to build on whether one is a Christian or not, and should be points around which people of all faiths can agree and co-operate, Speaking as a non-Christian, those values of love, joy and peace are of great importance to me, and I will gladly work with anyone who shares those values, regardless of whose name they do it in.
Well said. These are good principles to build on whether one is a Christian or not, and should be points around which people of all faiths can agree and co-operate, Speaking as a non-Christian, those values of love, joy and peace are of great importance to me, and I will gladly work with anyone who shares those values, regardless of whose name they do it in. Nimue Brown

1:41pm Mon 30 Dec 13

TigerTigerBurningBright says...

I wonder how many church roofs can be repaired with love, joy and peace?

In fact it would be interesting to know how much of the church's huge estate was paid for by love, joy and peace, and not by grabbing money from the poor through fear and the promise of a non-existant afterlife.
I wonder how many church roofs can be repaired with love, joy and peace? In fact it would be interesting to know how much of the church's huge estate was paid for by love, joy and peace, and not by grabbing money from the poor through fear and the promise of a non-existant afterlife. TigerTigerBurningBright

2:03pm Mon 30 Dec 13

dimreepr says...

Tiger, whilst we live in a secular society today it wasn’t always the case and the tithes paid by the populace to the church is just an example of early taxation. It’s just too easy to criticise with the knowledge our academics have accumulated and passed on to us and just because some, in the churches past, have chosen to take advantage of the general ignorance of the day to line their pockets; does not equate to general corruption now.
Tiger, whilst we live in a secular society today it wasn’t always the case and the tithes paid by the populace to the church is just an example of early taxation. It’s just too easy to criticise with the knowledge our academics have accumulated and passed on to us and just because some, in the churches past, have chosen to take advantage of the general ignorance of the day to line their pockets; does not equate to general corruption now. dimreepr

2:52pm Mon 30 Dec 13

TigerTigerBurningBright says...

There has always been corruption and there always will be.

Taxation to help the sick and needy is acceptable; taxation to build massive buildings and provide comfortable lifestyles for a very few is not.
There has always been corruption and there always will be. Taxation to help the sick and needy is acceptable; taxation to build massive buildings and provide comfortable lifestyles for a very few is not. TigerTigerBurningBright

3:15pm Mon 30 Dec 13

dimreepr says...

Point well missed, the building of churches was, at the time, built with the full support of the local community; the search for corruption in these times does not start with the church.
Point well missed, the building of churches was, at the time, built with the full support of the local community; the search for corruption in these times does not start with the church. dimreepr

4:55pm Mon 30 Dec 13

TigerTigerBurningBright says...

"built with the full support of the local community"

Point missed completely. Utterly. Without any attempt to understand what was being said before starting the usual dim argument in a paper bag.
"built with the full support of the local community" Point missed completely. Utterly. Without any attempt to understand what was being said before starting the usual dim argument in a paper bag. TigerTigerBurningBright

9:55am Tue 31 Dec 13

dimreepr says...

Same sad old tactics I see Tiger, when you have no counter argument, you try to subvert my words and pop in an ad hominen for good measure; the actions of one who’s completely out of his/her depth.
Same sad old tactics I see Tiger, when you have no counter argument, you try to subvert my words and pop in an ad hominen for good measure; the actions of one who’s completely out of his/her depth. dimreepr

11:45am Thu 2 Jan 14

TigerTigerBurningBright says...

Same old tactics, I see dim. You have no answer to the points I raise, you pick a fight when there is none, and you are unable to come up with your own arguments, preferring to use Internet cliches instead.
You will be itching to have the last word, so go on, be our guest.
Same old tactics, I see dim. You have no answer to the points I raise, you pick a fight when there is none, and you are unable to come up with your own arguments, preferring to use Internet cliches instead. You will be itching to have the last word, so go on, be our guest. TigerTigerBurningBright

3:27pm Thu 2 Jan 14

dimreepr says...

LMAO that's a second irony meter broken; will you ever learn?
LMAO that's a second irony meter broken; will you ever learn? dimreepr

6:31pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Cuthbert Thickett says...

Tiger, derailing this thread to vent your opinions on religion is quite silly, the thrust of the original article is admirable, regardless of who the originator was. The love of money for its own sake is a pointless love. The good that we can all do if we work together for the greater good far outweighs the value iof money. Spoiling the thread to have a go at a religion simplys shows a petty small minded prejudice and you have made yourself look small.
Tiger, derailing this thread to vent your opinions on religion is quite silly, the thrust of the original article is admirable, regardless of who the originator was. The love of money for its own sake is a pointless love. The good that we can all do if we work together for the greater good far outweighs the value iof money. Spoiling the thread to have a go at a religion simplys shows a petty small minded prejudice and you have made yourself look small. Cuthbert Thickett

12:52am Fri 3 Jan 14

TigerTigerBurningBright says...

It is a religious story, Cuthbert, or did you miss that? Have a look just under the photo of the bible, it is written there not once, but twice!! See, three clues in one!

If this had been about improving drainage in 20 acre wood, you'd be spot on, but it isn't, it is about religion. Oh, and this isn't a thread, it is a comment section on a local newspaper website story.

Dim, you just can't help yourself, can you.
It is a religious story, Cuthbert, or did you miss that? Have a look just under the photo of the bible, it is written there not once, but twice!! See, three clues in one! If this had been about improving drainage in 20 acre wood, you'd be spot on, but it isn't, it is about religion. Oh, and this isn't a thread, it is a comment section on a local newspaper website story. Dim, you just can't help yourself, can you. TigerTigerBurningBright

9:22am Fri 3 Jan 14

dimreepr says...

No tiger it’s not a religious story, yes inevitably it has a religious context, but essentially it’s about people paying as much attention to each other as they do to money. So yes, you have missed the point, completely, as Cuthbert and I have tried to point out, without flaming or insulting I might add, perhaps you should try that approach; it’s not as hard as you make it look.
No tiger it’s not a religious story, yes inevitably it has a religious context, but essentially it’s about people paying as much attention to each other as they do to money. So yes, you have missed the point, completely, as Cuthbert and I have tried to point out, without flaming or insulting I might add, perhaps you should try that approach; it’s not as hard as you make it look. dimreepr

11:57am Fri 3 Jan 14

TigerTigerBurningBright says...

You too! Did you both really miss these bits:

"This week's Christian comment is brought to you by Graham Collins of the Holy Trinity Church, Stroud
Christian comment with Graham Collins of the Holy Trinity Church, Stroud"

"We have much to learn about life and living together and the Bible teaches us, particularly in the Book of Revelation, that we can enjoy a New World in Christ that will truly show us a place of love, joy and peace."

It's a Christian comment. It is part of the continuing series of religious articles in this paper. Do you think it would have been published if it had been:

"Comment from Graham Collins of Stroud"?

Plus it is fair game to comment on the church's wealth and where it came from, if a member of the church is exerting others to eschew money. It is easy to do that when you already have it, isn't it...
You too! Did you both really miss these bits: "This week's Christian comment is brought to you by Graham Collins of the Holy Trinity Church, Stroud Christian comment with Graham Collins of the Holy Trinity Church, Stroud" "We have much to learn about life and living together and the Bible teaches us, particularly in the Book of Revelation, that we can enjoy a New World in Christ that will truly show us a place of love, joy and peace." It's a Christian comment. It is part of the continuing series of religious articles in this paper. Do you think it would have been published if it had been: "Comment from Graham Collins of Stroud"? Plus it is fair game to comment on the church's wealth and where it came from, if a member of the church is exerting others to eschew money. It is easy to do that when you already have it, isn't it... TigerTigerBurningBright

10:38pm Fri 3 Jan 14

dimreepr says...

You’re confusing the context within which the article is written and the context of the article itself, for instance the quote you cite is merely a support for the articles main assertion and so you’d be correct outside that context, however it isn’t.
The issue as to what is published by the SNJ is entirely for the owners and editor; and is not subject to your acceptance.
It’s not fair game to comment on the origins of the churches wealth, if you are unaware of those origins; Siddhartha Gautama was a very rich man when he asserted others should shun material wealth, does that invalidate Buddhism?
You’re confusing the context within which the article is written and the context of the article itself, for instance the quote you cite is merely a support for the articles main assertion and so you’d be correct outside that context, however it isn’t. The issue as to what is published by the SNJ is entirely for the owners and editor; and is not subject to your acceptance. It’s not fair game to comment on the origins of the churches wealth, if you are unaware of those origins; Siddhartha Gautama was a very rich man when he asserted others should shun material wealth, does that invalidate Buddhism? dimreepr

1:20pm Sat 4 Jan 14

TigerTigerBurningBright says...

It is a religious article, in the religion spot. So fair game to discuss religion.
You are not an editor of this paper so you have no right to tell others what to or what not to add here as comment. You are of as little consequence as the rest of us.
The editors and owner of this paper produce this website and allow comments because they want interaction. I am interacting, giving my feedback. Who knows, one day there might not be a reserved place in newspapers for religion, we can but pray for that.

You've made a fool of yourself by creating a fight with no basis and now you are desperately backtracking. A frantic backtracking backed up by the significant library of internet cliches you have collected.
It is a religious article, in the religion spot. So fair game to discuss religion. You are not an editor of this paper so you have no right to tell others what to or what not to add here as comment. You are of as little consequence as the rest of us. The editors and owner of this paper produce this website and allow comments because they want interaction. I am interacting, giving my feedback. Who knows, one day there might not be a reserved place in newspapers for religion, we can but pray for that. You've made a fool of yourself by creating a fight with no basis and now you are desperately backtracking. A frantic backtracking backed up by the significant library of internet cliches you have collected. TigerTigerBurningBright

4:40pm Sat 4 Jan 14

dimreepr says...

You win, tiger, you're far to clever for me.
You win, tiger, you're far to clever for me. dimreepr

4:46pm Sat 4 Jan 14

dimreepr says...

Now will you pay for my irony meter?
Now will you pay for my irony meter? dimreepr

5:01pm Sat 4 Jan 14

dimreepr says...

I’m sorry Tiger maybe I should explain, irony means:

1: Pretence of ignorance and of willingness to learn from another assumed in order to make the other’s false conceptions conspicuous by adroit questioning —called also Socratic irony.

2: a) the use of words to express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning
b) a usually humorous or sardonic literary style or form characterized by irony
c) an ironic expression or utterance.

3: a) Incongruity between the actual result of a sequence of events and the normal or expected result; an event or result marked by such incongruity
b) incongruity between a situation developed in a drama and the accompanying words or actions that is understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play —called also dramatic irony, tragic irony.

A simple way of putting it, and I think we need a simple way, is that irony usually signals a difference between the appearance of things and reality.
I’m sorry Tiger maybe I should explain, irony means: 1: Pretence of ignorance and of willingness to learn from another assumed in order to make the other’s false conceptions conspicuous by adroit questioning —called also Socratic irony. 2: a) the use of words to express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning b) a usually humorous or sardonic literary style or form characterized by irony c) an ironic expression or utterance. 3: a) Incongruity between the actual result of a sequence of events and the normal or expected result; an event or result marked by such incongruity b) incongruity between a situation developed in a drama and the accompanying words or actions that is understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play —called also dramatic irony, tragic irony. A simple way of putting it, and I think we need a simple way, is that irony usually signals a difference between the appearance of things and reality. dimreepr

6:07pm Mon 6 Jan 14

TigerTigerBurningBright says...

"You win, tiger, you're far to clever for me."

to clever what?
"You win, tiger, you're far to clever for me." to clever what? TigerTigerBurningBright

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