Neil Carmichael re-selected as Conservative candidate for 2015

Stroud News and Journal: Neil Carmichael re-selected as Conservative candidate for 2015 Neil Carmichael re-selected as Conservative candidate for 2015

STROUD MP Neil Carmichael has been reselected to defend his seat at the 2015 General Election.

On Monday night he was officially readopted by the Stroud Conservative party constituency executive to try and win a second term.

Next year he will defend a majority of 1,299 votes over Labour’s candidate David Drew, who lost his seat to Mr Carmichael in 2010 after serving three terms as Stroud’s MP.

Mr Carmichael told the Gazette he was very pleased and was looking forward to helping with the Conservative campaigning in the Stroud district elections in May this year.

Mr Drew has already been reselected to stand in 2015 and the UK Independence Party has chosen Caroline Stephens to also stand for the Stroud seat.

Comments (8)

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4:32pm Tue 15 Apr 14

GlawsStudent92 says...

Only the Executive? So ordinary Tory members didn't get a say? I wonder why... Perhaps they were worried they would come to the same conclusion the electorate might next year!
Only the Executive? So ordinary Tory members didn't get a say? I wonder why... Perhaps they were worried they would come to the same conclusion the electorate might next year! GlawsStudent92
  • Score: 7

8:04pm Tue 15 Apr 14

BigBoy22 says...

Ha! David Drew must be dancing in the street. For the Tories to select Carmichael again they must be determined to hand this highly marginal seat to Labour. I can only assume that political reasons are behind this rather than common sense.
Ha! David Drew must be dancing in the street. For the Tories to select Carmichael again they must be determined to hand this highly marginal seat to Labour. I can only assume that political reasons are behind this rather than common sense. BigBoy22
  • Score: 8

12:37pm Thu 17 Apr 14

Salendine says...

Perhaps worth remembering that David Drew almost certainly lost his seat because of the failings of his party, not because of his own personal qualities. So the question over who we end up with as an MP will be settled on party politics, not personalities. The vocal minority criticise our MP often on here, but I doubt they are representative of the Stroud population.
Perhaps worth remembering that David Drew almost certainly lost his seat because of the failings of his party, not because of his own personal qualities. So the question over who we end up with as an MP will be settled on party politics, not personalities. The vocal minority criticise our MP often on here, but I doubt they are representative of the Stroud population. Salendine
  • Score: -5

9:09am Sun 20 Apr 14

BigBoy22 says...

Salendine wrote:
Perhaps worth remembering that David Drew almost certainly lost his seat because of the failings of his party, not because of his own personal qualities. So the question over who we end up with as an MP will be settled on party politics, not personalities. The vocal minority criticise our MP often on here, but I doubt they are representative of the Stroud population.
And that is precisely what the problem is with our country. People complain endlessly about our political system yet they continue to vote blindly for the same political parties, regardless of their policies and / or individual attributes. Until the electorate wakes up to what it's doing, nothing will ever change.
[quote][p][bold]Salendine[/bold] wrote: Perhaps worth remembering that David Drew almost certainly lost his seat because of the failings of his party, not because of his own personal qualities. So the question over who we end up with as an MP will be settled on party politics, not personalities. The vocal minority criticise our MP often on here, but I doubt they are representative of the Stroud population.[/p][/quote]And that is precisely what the problem is with our country. People complain endlessly about our political system yet they continue to vote blindly for the same political parties, regardless of their policies and / or individual attributes. Until the electorate wakes up to what it's doing, nothing will ever change. BigBoy22
  • Score: 5

10:18am Sun 20 Apr 14

Salendine says...

On the contrary. David Drew was voted out precisely because of his parties policies. Clearly thousands had looked at the failings of his party and decided to change their vote rather than just vote as they had always done. As ever much of the Tories social policies leave much to be desired, but the economy is picking up, inflation down, and employment up. David Drew has a challenge on his hands getting back in, fine fellow though I'm sure he is.
On the contrary. David Drew was voted out precisely because of his parties policies. Clearly thousands had looked at the failings of his party and decided to change their vote rather than just vote as they had always done. As ever much of the Tories social policies leave much to be desired, but the economy is picking up, inflation down, and employment up. David Drew has a challenge on his hands getting back in, fine fellow though I'm sure he is. Salendine
  • Score: -4

7:46am Mon 21 Apr 14

Rock Cake says...

Salendine wrote:
On the contrary. David Drew was voted out precisely because of his parties policies. Clearly thousands had looked at the failings of his party and decided to change their vote rather than just vote as they had always done. As ever much of the Tories social policies leave much to be desired, but the economy is picking up, inflation down, and employment up. David Drew has a challenge on his hands getting back in, fine fellow though I'm sure he is.
I beg to differ. I believe what we saw at the last general election was a manifestation of the anger voters felt towards MPs and their expenses. Mr Drew was simply a victim of that protest vote, which was most ironic when one considers of the 650 or so MPs in Parliament, Mr Drew had the 3rd lowest expenses. In Stonehouse, we've barely seen Mr Carmichael and I can't think of anything he's done to promote or improve the town, whereas Mr Drew, even as a Councillor, has remained active and continues to speak out on matters ranging from the abominable Javelin Park Incinerator, opposing green belt development for housing, right through to challenging the lack of a youth club for the kids of the town. That's what I want from my MP, so I know whom I shall be voting for next May.
[quote][p][bold]Salendine[/bold] wrote: On the contrary. David Drew was voted out precisely because of his parties policies. Clearly thousands had looked at the failings of his party and decided to change their vote rather than just vote as they had always done. As ever much of the Tories social policies leave much to be desired, but the economy is picking up, inflation down, and employment up. David Drew has a challenge on his hands getting back in, fine fellow though I'm sure he is.[/p][/quote]I beg to differ. I believe what we saw at the last general election was a manifestation of the anger voters felt towards MPs and their expenses. Mr Drew was simply a victim of that protest vote, which was most ironic when one considers of the 650 or so MPs in Parliament, Mr Drew had the 3rd lowest expenses. In Stonehouse, we've barely seen Mr Carmichael and I can't think of anything he's done to promote or improve the town, whereas Mr Drew, even as a Councillor, has remained active and continues to speak out on matters ranging from the abominable Javelin Park Incinerator, opposing green belt development for housing, right through to challenging the lack of a youth club for the kids of the town. That's what I want from my MP, so I know whom I shall be voting for next May. Rock Cake
  • Score: 5

10:39am Tue 22 Apr 14

Salendine says...

Don't disagree with what you want from an MP, or the value of David Drew's contribution (you should have added opposition to Free Schools, Steiner especially), and I'm not supporting the Tory MP. You do contradict yourself though. Why would people vote out a high value MP because of expense claims?

Fact remains, many of the voters changed allegiance at the last election because of the failings of the Labour party, and I think you are using the expenses scandal as a way of shying away from the truth.
Don't disagree with what you want from an MP, or the value of David Drew's contribution (you should have added opposition to Free Schools, Steiner especially), and I'm not supporting the Tory MP. You do contradict yourself though. Why would people vote out a high value MP because of expense claims? Fact remains, many of the voters changed allegiance at the last election because of the failings of the Labour party, and I think you are using the expenses scandal as a way of shying away from the truth. Salendine
  • Score: -2

12:54am Wed 23 Apr 14

Steve Collins says...

David Drew lost in 2010 as the result of a general swing away from Labour and towards the Conservatives.

That gave Neil Carmichael his long awaited chance to cement his place as our district's constituency MP. In my view he has blown it. David Drew remains a highly popular figure locally for his grassroots campaigning, his defence of the 'little man' and his common touch. Carmichael has none of these attributes.

In particular, he has failed to stand up for residents blighted by inappropriate housing developments. He has chosen to attempt to shift the blame onto the local council, when anyone with a brain can see that the fault lies with the Government's rewriting of planning legislation, allied to their cynical weasel words about 'Localism', when in fact they are simply in cahoots with developers to build anywhere, anytime.

Regardless of the national outcome of the next election, David Drew will be our next MP. Our constituency will once again be decided by the quality and effectiveness of the individual, rather than the popularity of the party he or she represents. And of course, UKIP will take a significant number of Tory votes from Carmichael.

He's not popular in Stonehouse, and he's not popular in Cam and Dursley. He knows this, hence his 'lauding' of the £1.4 million investment in the local pool - directly contradicting his miserable local Tory councillors. But it's too late - whatever he does cannot hide the last four years of ineptitude.

In a way I feel sorry for him. He's not a bad man, but he's not a good MP. Back to Northumberland Neil!
David Drew lost in 2010 as the result of a general swing away from Labour and towards the Conservatives. That gave Neil Carmichael his long awaited chance to cement his place as our district's constituency MP. In my view he has blown it. David Drew remains a highly popular figure locally for his grassroots campaigning, his defence of the 'little man' and his common touch. Carmichael has none of these attributes. In particular, he has failed to stand up for residents blighted by inappropriate housing developments. He has chosen to attempt to shift the blame onto the local council, when anyone with a brain can see that the fault lies with the Government's rewriting of planning legislation, allied to their cynical weasel words about 'Localism', when in fact they are simply in cahoots with developers to build anywhere, anytime. Regardless of the national outcome of the next election, David Drew will be our next MP. Our constituency will once again be decided by the quality and effectiveness of the individual, rather than the popularity of the party he or she represents. And of course, UKIP will take a significant number of Tory votes from Carmichael. He's not popular in Stonehouse, and he's not popular in Cam and Dursley. He knows this, hence his 'lauding' of the £1.4 million investment in the local pool - directly contradicting his miserable local Tory councillors. But it's too late - whatever he does cannot hide the last four years of ineptitude. In a way I feel sorry for him. He's not a bad man, but he's not a good MP. Back to Northumberland Neil! Steve Collins
  • Score: 2

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