Train services are disrupted across Britain as thousands of railway workers stage their second strike of the week.

Around 40,000 members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union at Network Rail and 13 train operators walked out again on Thursday (June 23) after talks failed to resolve a bitter row over pay, jobs and conditions.

Just one in five trains are running, and they are mostly restricted to main lines, with around half of the network closed.


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Several major stations were virtually deserted on Thursday morning, including London Euston and London Paddington.

Stroud News and Journal: RMT members on a picket line (PA)RMT members on a picket line (PA)

The strikes have been taking place over pay disputes, and a question has arisen on if striking rail workers get paid when they are taking part in industrial action.

Do rail workers get paid when they are on strike?

Under UK law employers do not have to pay employees who are on strike

On the UK Government website it says: "You do not have to pay employees who are on strike. If workers take action short of a strike, and refuse to carry out part of their contractual work, this is called ‘partial performance’.

"If you refuse to accept partial performance, you must tell employees that: they should only attend work if they fulfil their contractual duties [and] if they do not fulfil the terms of their employment contract, you do not have to pay them. If you do accept partial performance, you must still pay employees for any work that they have done."